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A Lecture by Dr. Deborah Winslow on Pottery and Progress: What Can We Learn from Observing a Sinhalese Village Over 40 Years?

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The United States-Sri Lanka Fulbright Commission

Presents a Lecture

by

Dr. Deborah Winslow

on

Pottery and Progress: What Can We Learn from

Observing a Sinhalese Village Over 40 Years?

clip_image003In this lecture, anthropologist Deborah Winslow will describe the changes she has observed in a Kurunegala District village of pottery makers. While the country has shifted from a closed to an open economy and survived tragic civil conflict, this village has prospered and thrived. It has done so without abandoning either pottery making or social norms of kin unity and community generosity. Their story is both fascinating and instructive about human adaptability, successful economic development, and long-term research.

                                                     Date: Friday, 30 August 2013

                                                           Time: 6.00 – 7.00 p.m.

Tea will be served from 5.30 – 6.00 p.m.

Venue: United States-Sri Lanka Fulbright Commission Auditorium

New Address: 55 Abdul Caffoor Mawatha, Colombo 3

(off Duplication Road, next to Stone & String)

Entry: By prior registration only – seating will be on a first-come first-served basis.

Call: 256 4176 and 471- 8744 to register

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Deborah Winslow is Program Director for Cultural Anthropology at the National Science Foundation (U.S.A.). Her research in Sri Lanka and India has be

en supported by Fulbright, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Institute for Sri Lankan Studies, and the Univ. of New Hampshire. Dr. Winslow’s publications include: "The Village Clay: Recursive Innovations and Community Self-Fashioning Among Sinhalese Potters," which won the 2009 Curl Essay Prize of the Royal Anthropological Institute (U.K.); Economy, Culture, and Civil War in Sri Lanka (co-authored and edited with Michael D. Woost); and "Status and Context: Sri Lankan Potter Women Reconsidered After Fieldwork in India" (Comparative Studies in Society and History).